Sensors & Systems

SEAM is currently working on sensors and systems to improve efficiency and accuracy of processes and procedures.

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Realism : Real-Time In situ Monitoring of Tool Wear

The aim of REALISM is to develop a robust ‘smart’ sensor-based system to provide accurate, real-time analysis of the process performance and alter the machining process to optimal conditions, resulting in better control of the process and reducing scrap rates, in precision engineering facilities throughout Europe and globally, REALISM consortium comprises of seven partners from five European member states. This project has received funding from the European Union’s seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no: 315067

REALISM is a two year project, in which three small-medium size enterprises (SMEs) and four research and technological development (RTD) providers, from four countries, have come together to overcome issues relating high scrap rates caused by tool wear in the precision engineering sector.
SME partners include Schivo, a precision engineering company based in Ireland, Tulino, an SME based in Italy, who design and fabricate parts, tools and fixtures for aerospace and biomedical industries and IDT, an engineering firm, based in Norway. The RTD providers include the Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT, Ireland), specialising in materials analysis and electronics, Warsaw University of Technology (WUT, Poland), specialising in machine monitoring, University of Naples (UNINA, Italy), specialising in sensor and decision making systems and Gjøvik University College, specialising in social impact and increased knowledge transfer as a result of implementing process monitoring systems.
The proposed project aims to bring a new sensor system to precision engineering facilities throughout Europe and globally, which will considerably reduce machining scrap costs.
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Cartilage Defect Measurement System
Damage to articular cartilage is currently assessed through a visual estimation using an arthroscopic probe, which is prone to a large degree of error. SEAM is currently developing an arthroscopically accessible measurement device that can accurately assess the size of cartilage defects.


Drug Delivery Technologies
SEAM is involved in a collaborative project with the PMBrc in the development of a device for injectable and biodegradable long-acting formulations for sustained drug release. The project is funded by Enterprise Ireland under the Commercialisation fund.